AI Use Cases For Communities & Networks

networkArtificial Intelligence is arguably the buzziest of buzz words these days. Yet, there is a reason for the hype: AI could support a radical transformation of online community management and experience: automation of routine tasks, real-time insight, enhanced personalization and the enhanced agency of an individual in digital ecosystems.

For business leaders shaping online community strategy, AI holds promise to help solve two of the biggest challenges with online communities: 1) Quantifying the value of community investment and delivering timely and actionable insight and 2) Managing large networks of relationships at scale.

To Start: What is AI?

In the context of Community, AI can be thought of as an agent, or set of agents that

  • is / are connected to real time data sources;
  • has / have the ability to act in the community (or admin interface); and
  • has / have specific goals to make progress towards.

 From the Wikipedia entry on AI:
“In computer science AI research is defined as the study of “intelligent agents“: any device that perceives its environment and takes actions that maximize its chance of successfully achieving its goals.[1] Colloquially, the term “artificial intelligence” is applied when a machine mimics “cognitive” functions that humans associate with other human minds, such as “learning” and “problem solving”.[2]   

“Isn’t this just an algorithm?” is the next natural question, and the answer is “well, not really.” Algorithms are complex sets of bounded instructions, and they aren’t (typically) designed to learn from their environment and evolve.

Where are we on the map?

Clearly, interest, investment and experimentation in AI by corporations is increasing year over year. According to Harvard Business Review, which surveyed over 3,000 organizations, 20 percent of companies used AI in a core part of their business model, and 41 percent were experimenting or piloting in 2017 (a total of 61 percent).

Narrative Science partnered with the National Business Research Institute and found the same numbers: 61 percent of surveyed respondents utilized AI in their corporations in 2017 (up from the 38 percent in 2016). The study also found that 35 percent of respondents use AI for interaction with customers (a.k.a. potential community members).

A recent study by Constellation Research found that 70% of the organizations they studied were already investing in AI and that 60% were expecting to increase their investment by 50% or more this year.

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Image Source: Constellation Research 2018 Artificial Intelligence Study

Community Leaders and Community Platform Providers have been leveraging simplistic AI tools for more than a decade, primarily for automating community moderation tasks and supporting member personalization. An early example: we launched TechRepblic.com in ’99 with an overly-complex community and content personalization function and wound up pulling back on the functionality in subsequent releases because of the technical overhead.

Emerging Use Cases for AI 

We (Stucture3C) are in the midst on a year-long research project, C3/A3,  studying how organizations are using / planning to use AI in their online communities. In our first wave of research with 40 Community Professionals at large organizations, we asked what types of advanced technologies they are considering or  implementing, including AI and related technologies. Personalization, bots / agents and analytics topped the list.

tech_consideration

Digging deeper, we wanted to understand the most valuable use cases under consideration: We found that corporations are either piloting or planning to use AI in three key areas: Customer Experience, Community Management, and Analytics / Insights.
Customer Experience (for Community Members)
Examples include:
  • Advanced personalization based on profile / activity
  • Recommendations of people and content
  • Conversational interfaces, including chatbots
  • Agents (acting on behalf of a member)

From the write in responses:
“(We are evaluating)… Machine Learning that automates personalization for content, news, interaction models.”

Community Management (for Community Managers)
Examples include:
  • Influencer & Advocate identification
  • Escalation identification – ID’ing people who need help, like Facebook’s suicide threat technology
  • Moderation of content and member behavior
  • Suggested actions (what to do next in the community)
  • Suggested content (to produce, based on member behavior and other signals)

From the write in responses:
“(We are)…Leveraging machine learning in our peer to peer support community to predict certain kinds of moderation needs, such as suicidal escalations or harassment etc. Better sentiment/text analysis.”

“(We are piloting)…AI text analysis to draw insights from unstructured data feeds (with reduced dependency on tagging)”

Analytics / Insights (for Executive / Business Stakeholders)
Examples include:
  • Community health
  • ROI measures
  • Areas of investment
  • Identifying customer behavior trends
  • Gleaning insight for product / service enhancement

From the write in responses:
“Predictive – I want to present our users with timely and relevant content, before they even know they need it in some cases. If we know what you’re doing with our products and what your behaviors are in community, we should be able to activate that data into meaningful upgrades to the experience in both places.”

#TeamHuman vs. the Machines

Swiss Futurist Gerd Leonard characterizes the broad adoption of AI and related technologies as a battle of “Technology vs. Humanity”. The statement is hyperbolic, but the intent is spot in: we have to act now to ensure enabling human agency and purpose remains at the heart of any broadly deployed technology, including AI.  Australian Online Community pioneer Venessa Paech says it best in a recent article:

“Instead of being replaced, community experts will upgrade. We’ll work to help businesses set up bots and intelligent interactions. We’ll plot behavioural frameworks for machine learning. We’ll spill into HR, marketing, IT, innovation – anywhere there’s a need to understand and optimise social intelligence. Leveraging AI for communities demands we extend our capabilities as social systems engineers. If we get it right, we can see to it that AI augments our best natures, not our worst.

Participants in Wave 1 of the C3/A3 project are also optimistic about the possibilities of AI:

“I’m excited about the shift that AI could bring – instead of being reactive, let’s be proactive. I’d also like to use this tech to identify the things that we can flatly stop doing and redirect those efforts into more valuable activities.”

“I’m really excited to see how AI & ML augment and enhance a community member’s experience rather than replace any of the human aspects!”

Conclusion

Essentially, we think the value of AI is threefold for Community Professionals:

  • AI will allow for the automation of routine community tasks and processes so that focus can be put on more valuable activities;
  • AI will provide real-time analytics, insight, and specific and contextual suggestions;
  • AI will shape the community experience for all stakeholders, including members (onsite), prospective members (externally), Community Managers and Executive Stakeholders.

We think future communities will thrive with AI if the ultimate goal of the community is enabling member agency and purpose. Perhaps paradoxically, the future of community management will likely depend on Community Managers becoming comfortable with, and knowledgable about, intelligent agents and automation, while doubling down on the art and science of human interactions and group facilitation.

Interested in participating in the research? Take the survey here.
Have questions, or interested in a briefing? Please reach out.

Gratitude: I wanted to give a shout out to Venessa Paech. The motivation to start the C3A3 project was inspired, in part, by conversations with her at, and following, the 2017 SWARM Community Management Conference. Be sure to read Venessa’s thought piece on AI and Community Management. I also highly recommend the SWARM conference, being held in Melbourne this year, August 30-31.

 

Purpose Will Power Future Online Communities

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Purpose
“…people’s identification of, and intention to pursue, particular highly valued, overarching life goals.” (Steger & Dik, 2010).

a.k.a. “Your reason for getting up in the morning.”
Bryan Dik PhD – Professor of Psychology at Colorado State & Cofounder of Jobzology

The Fine Line Between Engagement & Manipulation

Growthhacking, gamification, content snacks and personalization. Your feed is overflowing with tricks, hacks and best practices to “drive engagement”. The best of these techniques tap into a member’s intrinsic motivation to trigger participation, the worst rely on psychological tricks and negative emotional responses.

What if there was a way to create sustained engagement in communities and collaborative experiences that harnessed genuine motivation and strove for positive outcomes for participants? Through my work as a Fellow with Life Reimagined, I have (with my team of Fellows) developed an approach that taps into the power of purpose to drive community engagement.

Purpose-Driven Communities

As Community Architects (and Builders, Managers, Hosts, etc), we’ve always known that we needed to define a community’s purpose as part of strategic development, but we generally haven’t paid much attention to the role of purpose for community participants. Tactical goals in the context of a community experience, yes. Thinking about the community member as a “whole person” with a life beyond your community? Let’s be honest – rarely.

Our community experiences today are largely designed around the limitations of the platform we choose to grow our communities on. Content (posts and messages) is typically the most dynamic element, followed by algorithmically-driven “streams”. Reputation elements develop over time and are helpful to make judgements about the value of content and contributors, but it is hard to say any given community experience truly evolves.  On the whole, the Community experiences are surprisingly static.

There is opportunity for improvement here. Looking at Communities through the lens of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, you can make a case that online communities support many of the needs that Abraham Maslow describes in his model, especially 1.) Belonging (through social connections), and 2.) Esteem (through participation and the advancement through reputation system). The missing ingredient has been the proverbial top of the pyramid: Self-Actualization.

What might happen if the community and collaborative experiences we designed supported the discovery, refinement and actualization of a person’s purpose?

 

Screen Shot 2016-05-09 at 3.32.29 PMNext, think about what a community might look like if the host organization was actively refining and expressing its purpose through community interactions. As an example: If a software company’s purpose is to empower the world through digital design software, you could imagine community activities going well beyond break/ fix support forums and into eduction, skills mentoring and specific efforts to reach people in the developing world and the associated technological challenges. The host organization evolves from an authoritarian role to become a responsive partner in co-development.

Early Development of the Purpose Model – In Flight Now

In November of 2015, I was honored to be chosen as part of the inaugural Rand Fellows with the Life Reimagined Institute.  I was asked to be team leader and had the opportunity to work with Bryan Dik, Brooke Erol and Roberta Taylor on my team. Our team was mentored by an amazing group of thought leaders, including Richard Leider, Alan Weber (co-founder of Fast Company) and Dr. Janet Taylor. The goal of my team was to create community-based programs that help people discover, refine and express their purpose. My team of fellows is in the middle of a pilot and research project that lasts through the end of July to study the best ways to help our community of participants discover, refine and express purpose through their work. Our team took the Life Reimagined process (shown in the graphic below) and mapped community activities to each stage to come up with the needed content and features for our pilot community program.

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Meaningful Results Beyond Engagement

One of the most incredible outcomes of our pilot program was that we saw significant improvement in 12 of 20 psychosocial variables that we measured in our participants. Specifically, we saw large gains in feelings of Happiness, Resilience, Presence of Meaning, and Career Decision Self-Efficacy. We also saw reductions in feelings of Loneliness and Depression in participants.

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Implications

We are in the early days of developing a model for Purpose-Driven Communities but we are already seeing impactful results from our studies. The Purpose-based model I’ve described doesn’t exist in the wild (yet), but the time to consider the implications and possibilities is now if you want your organization’s community to evolve beyond static growth, low engagement and specious results & impact . There are many positive and disruptive implications of the model – I’ve highlighted a few below.

  1. Shared Purpose of Community 
    • Hosts will have to clearly state the purpose of their community, as well as help individual community members define, refine and express their purpose in the community experience. The development of a “Purpose Model” is required.
  2. Purpose Expressed in Community Leadership and Actions (Member)
    • Once the “Purpose Model” is created, more effective Member journeys, reputation and roles can be developed that align near term activities with longer-term accomplishments.
  3. Evolving Role of Community Manager
    • Once the language of Purpose is understood in a community, and once members and hosts can share their purpose (via statements / profile), the Community Manager can play a critical role of connecting members with the content, people and activities they need to actualize the member’s purpose.
  4. A New System of Context & Feedback Loops (Platform)
    • New tools will need to be developed to facilitate purpose discovery, and to drive the community experience through context (activity streams, member matching & networking, journey models)  and feedback loops (based on activity).
  5. Federated Communities
    • The expression of an individual’s purpose is a large and complex topic. It is unlikely that any one community or organization can fully support the breadth of an individual’s need. Complimentary communities have an opportunity to partner around customer types and segments to offer experiences that support purpose. We will begin to see examples of Federated Communities as an alternative to mass social networks in the next 12-24. Powering these Community Federations with Purpose will be a game changer.

In Summary

Creating a Purpose-driven model for communities will be a break through in performance, engagement and impact for many organizations. This new model will create the canvas for life-long relationships that are based on mutually beneficial outcomes for the host and member. Community platforms, programs and roles will need to evolve to realize the full value of the model.

About Structure3C
I will continue to research and write about the Purpose-driven Community Model as part of my ongoing #NetworkThinking series. To stay up to date, subscribe to my newsletter here.

I’m currently working a select list of clients to build amazing communities. If you would like to schedule some time to talk about how I can help, bill@structure3c.com.